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08. Jul, 2014

Review of Essential Gear for Adventure Cycle Touring

Review of Essential Gear for Adventure Cycle Touring

We recently got a copy of Tom Allen’s new Essential Gear for Adventure Cycle Touring and thought it was such a great guide that we should share it with you.

gold backdropsThe guide focuses on all the gear you could possibly need for a cycle tour – long or short distance. It is the kind of thing we would really have benefited from reading when we were planning our South America trip, as we got very lost scanning through endless websites and forums for advice.

Essential Gear is split into two parts. The first looks at making decisions based on your situation. Do you have money to spend? What kind of trip are you planning? Do you really need expensive gear? Does an item do more than one thing?

These are really good points to consider. Some of the kit we bought, at not inconsiderable cost, like our water filter, turned out to get little use. Whereas, cheap electrical tape was one of the best things we took with us. It fixed holes in our bags, patched up chips on our bike frames and we even used it as rim tape.trustopt 挂靠

essential-gear-v2194The second part of the guide looks in detail at the different kinds of gear you might need. If, like us, you love kit then this is a salivating section to read through. However, Tom sensibly takes readers through all the decisions to be made, emphasising that many of the questions that are so easy to get hung up on – like should I take a steel or aluminium frame – are really not that important, and there is no right answer.

The guide is packed with great photographs and tips from other cyclists, which illustrates the really sensible points that Tom makes. If you are new to cycle touring or are planning a long trip for the first time, this guide is going to be invaluable to helping you through the organisational phase. It will also get you very excited about the adventures that lay ahead.

Essential Gear for Adventure Cycle Touring is available to download at gearforcycletouring.com.

28. May, 2012

Spot the dead donkey: Belem to Teresina

Spot the dead donkey: Belem to Teresina

Back on the bikes after an extended break, we were anticipating an easy 900km across northern Brazil from Belem to Teresina. What we found, however, was undulating terrain, roads in bad condition, heavy traffic and strong winds along a dull, monotonous road, with only assorted roadkill to take our minds of the pedalling. This is an area full of friendly people though who brightened up our long days on the road.

Having reached Macapa on the north shore of the Amazon River, we booked onto a passenger ferry for a 30 hour crossing to Belem. We had treated ourselves to a tiny, private cabin, rather than hanging up our hammocks, and on seeing the boat were glad we had. The hammock space was crowded with people lay head to toe with each other. (more…)

16. Apr, 2012

Pedalling about Guyana: Information for cycle tourists

Pedalling about Guyana: Information for cycle tourists

We cycled around Guyana in March/April 2012. Below are details of the route we took as well as other information cyclists planning a trip may find useful.

Guyana is unlike any other South American country we have visited. It feels more like the Caribbean with the laid back attitude, the twang of the spoken English and the fast bowling of the local cricketers on pitches across the country. (more…)

25. Nov, 2011

Crazy drivers, strange castles and desert, desert, desert on the road from Lima to Trujillo

Crazy drivers, strange castles and desert, desert, desert on the road from Lima to Trujillo

By now we are used to South America’s crazy, city traffic, so carefully planned our departure from Lima for 6am on a Sunday morning, when everybody should have been asleep. However, the ride out along the Panamerican Highway was the most nerve-wracking of the trip so far and we were glad, 50km along, to get onto the quieter coastal road with French cyclist, Joel, for company.

We left our hostal in Miraflores via deserted streets thanks to road closures for a running race later that day. Lulled into a false sense of security, we quickly woke up as the road spat us out into central Lima and we began dodging taxis, combis and tuk-tuks all driving without any indication or sense. It was a harrowing ride, the scariest departure we’ve done so far. We averaged 23km within the city trying to keep up with the traffic, and on the outskirts stopped for a rest, exhausted. (more…)